Top Domain Code (ccTLD)

TOP LEVEL DOMAIN generic (gTLD),  USA Top Level Domains and Country Code Top Level Domain (ccTLD). on this page we will understand more lajut are the names ekstesi (extension) of the Country Code Top Level Domain (ccTLD) were formally adopted in the world.

Next i'll shared a list of Country Code Top Level Domain (ccTLD):



  • .ac = Ascension Island
  • .ad = Andorra
  • .ae = United Arab Emirates
  • .af = Afghanistan
  • .ag = Antigua and Barbuda
  • .ai = Anguilla
  • .al = Albania
  • .am = Armenia
  • .an = Netherlands Antilles
  • .ao = Angola
  • .aq = Antarctica
  • .ar = Argentina
  • .as = American Samoa
  • .at = Austria
  • .au = Australia
  • .aw = Aruba
  • .ax = Åland
  • .az = Azerbaijan
  • .ba = Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • .bb = Barbados
  • .bd = Bangladesh
  • .be = Belgium
  • .bf = Burkina Faso
  • .bg = Bulgaria
  • .bh = Bahrain
  • .bi = Burundi
  • .bj = Benin
  • .bm = Bermuda
  • .bn = Brunei
  • .bo = Bolivia
  • .br = Brazil
  • .bs = Bahamas
  • .bt = Bhutan
  • .bv = Bouvet Island
  • .bw = Botswana
  • .by = Belarus
  • .bz = Belize
  • .ca = Canada
  • .cc = Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • .cd = Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • .cf = Central African Republic
  • .cg = Republic of the Congo
  • .ch = Switzerland
  • .ci = Côte d'Ivoire
  • .ck = Cook Islands
  • .cl = Chile
  • .cm = Cameroon
  • .cn = People's Republic of China
  • .co = Colombia
  • .cr = Costa Rica
  • .cs = Czechoslovakia
  • .cu = Cuba
  • .cv = Cape Verde
  • .cx = Christmas Island
  • .cy = Cyprus
  • .cz = Czech Republic
  • .dd = East Germany
  • .de = Germany
  • .dj = Djibouti
  • .dk = Denmark
  • .dm = Dominica
  • .do = Dominican Republic
  • .dz = Algeria
  • .ec = Ecuador
  • .ee = Estonia
  • .eg = Egypt
  • .eh = Western Sahara
  • .er = Eritrea
  • .es = Spain
  • .et = Ethiopia
  • .eu = European Union
  • .fi = Finland
  • .fj = Fiji
  • .fk = Falkland Islands
  • .fm = Federated States of Micronesia
  • .fo = Faroe Islands
  • .fr = France
  • .ga = Gabon
  • .gb = United Kingdom
  • .gd = Grenada
  • .ge = Georgia
  • .gf = French Guiana
  • .gg = Guernsey
  • .gh = Ghana
  • .gi = Gibraltar
  • .gl = Greenland
  • .gm = The Gambia
  • .gn = Guinea
  • .gp = Guadeloupe
  • .gq = Equatorial Guinea
  • .gr = Greece
  • .gs = South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • .gt = Guatemala
  • .gu = Guam
  • .gw = Guinea-Bissau
  • .gy = Guyana
  • .hk = Hong Kong
  • .hm = Heard Island and McDonald Islands
  • .hn = Honduras
  • .hr = Croatia
  • .ht = Haiti
  • .hu = Hungary
  • .id = Indonesia
  • .ie = Republic of Ireland
  • No = Northern Ireland
  • .il = Israel
  • .im = Isle of Man
  • .in = India
  • .io = British Indian Ocean Territory
  • .iq = Iraq
  • .ir = Iran
  • .is = Iceland
  • .it = Italy
  • .je = Jersey
  • .jm = Jamaica
  • .jo = Jordan
  • .jp = Japan
  • .ke = Kenya
  • .kg = Kyrgyzstan
  • .kh = Cambodia
  • .ki = Kiribati
  • .km = Comoros
  • .kn = Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • .kp = Democratic People's Republic of Korea
  • .kr = Republic of Korea
  • .kw = Kuwait
  • .ky = Cayman Islands
  • .kz = Kazakhstan
  • .la = Laos
  • .lb = Lebanon
  • .lc = Saint Lucia
  • .li = Liechtenstein
  • .lk = Sri Lanka
  • .lr = Liberia
  • .ls = Lesotho
  • .lt = Lithuania
  • .lu = Luxembourg
  • .lv = Latvia
  • .ly = Libya
  • .ma = Morocco
  • .mc = Monaco
  • .md = Moldova
  • .me = Montenegro
  • .mg = Madagascar
  • .mh = Marshall Islands
  • .mk = Macedonia
  • .ml = Mali
  • .mm = Myanmar
  • .mn = Mongolia
  • .mo = Macau
  • .mp = Northern Mariana Islands
  • .mq = Martinique
  • .mr = Mauritania
  • .ms = Montserrat
  • .mt = Malta
  • .mu = Mauritius
  • .mv = Maldives
  • .mw = Malawi
  • .mx = Mexico
  • .my = Malaysia
  • .mz = Mozambique
  • .na = Namibia
  • .nc = New Caledonia
  • .ne = Niger
  • .nf = Norfolk Island
  • .ng = Nigeria
  • .ni = Nicaragua
  • .nl = Netherlands
  • .no = Norway
  • .np = Nepal
  • .nr = Nauru
  • .nu = Niue
  • .nz = New Zealand
  • .om = Oman
  • .pa = Panama
  • .pe = Peru
  • .pf = French Polynesia
  • .pg = Papua New Guinea
  • .ph = Philippines
  • .pk = Pakistan
  • .pl = Poland
  • .pm = Saint-Pierre and Miquelon
  • .pn = Pitcairn Islands
  • .pr = Puerto Rico
  • .ps = Palestinian territories
  • .pt = Portugal
  • .pw = Palau
  • .py = Paraguay
  • .qa = Qatar
  • .re = Réunion
  • .ro = Romania
  • .rs = Serbia
  • .ru = Russia
  • .rw = Rwanda
  • .sa = Saudi Arabia
  • .sb = Solomon Islands
  • .sc = Seychelles
  • .sd = Sudan
  • .se = Sweden
  • .sg = Singapore
  • .sh = Saint Helena
  • .si = Slovenia
  • .sj = Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands
  • .sk = Slovakia
  • .sl = Sierra Leone
  • .sm = San Marino
  • .sn = Senegal
  • .so = Somalia
  • .sr = Suriname
  • .ss = South Sudan
  • .st = São Tomé and Príncipe
  • .su = Soviet Union
  • .sv = El Salvador
  • .sx = Sint Maarten
  • .sy = Syria
  • .sz = Swaziland
  • .tc = Turks and Caicos Islands
  • .td = Chad
  • .tf = French Southern and Antarctic Lands
  • .tg = Togo
  • .th = Thailand
  • .tj = Tokelau
  • .tl = East Timor
  • .tm = Turkmenistan
  • .tn = Tunisia
  • .to = Tonga
  • .tp = East Timor
  • .tr = Turkey
  • .tt = Trinidad and Tobago
  • .tv = Taiwan
  • .tz = Tanzania
  • .ua = Ukraine
  • .ug = Uganda
  • .uk = United Kingdom
  • .us = United States of America
  • .uy = Uruguay
  • .uz = Uzbekistan
  • .va = Vatican City
  • .vc = Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • .ve = Venezuela
  • .vg = British Virgin Islands
  • .vi = United States Virgin Islands
  • .vn = Vietnam
  • .vu = Vanuatu
  • .wf = Wallis and Futuna
  • .ws = Samoa
  • .ye = Yemen
  • .yt = Mayotte
  • .yu = SFR Yugoslavia
  • FR = Yugoslavia
  • .za = South Africa
  • .zm = Zambia
  • .zw = Zimbabwe


History and Definition Sci-Fi

 
History and Definition of Sci-Fi ( Science Fiction ) is a graphic chronology that maps the literary genre from its nascent roots in mythology and fantastic stories to the somewhat calcified post-Star Wars space opera epics of today. The movement of years is from left to right, tracing the figure of a tentacled beast, derived from H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds Martians. Science Fiction is seen as the offspring of the collision of the Enlightenment (providing science) and Romanticism, which birthed gothic fiction, source of not only SciFi, but crime novels, horror, westerns, and fantasy (all of which can be seen exiting through wormholes to their own diagrams, elsewhere). Science fiction progressed through a number of distinct periods, which are charted, citing hundreds of the most important works and authors. Film and television are covered as well. Resc : ( wardshelley ) 

Science fiction is a genre of fiction with imaginative but more or less plausible content such as settings in the future, futuristic science and technology, space travel, parallel universes, aliens, and paranormal abilities. Exploring the consequences of scientific innovations is one purpose of science fiction, making it a "literature of ideas". Science fiction has been used by authors and film/television program makers as a device to discuss philosophical ideas such as identity, desire, morality and social structure etc.

Science fiction is largely based on writing rationally about alternative possible worlds or futures. It is similar to, but differs from fantasy in that, within the context of the story, its imaginary elements are largely possible within scientifically established or scientifically postulated laws of nature (though some elements in a story might still be pure imaginative speculation).

The settings for science fiction are often contrary to consensus reality, but most science fiction relies on a considerable degree of suspension of disbelief, which is facilitated in the reader's mind by potential scientific explanations or solutions to various fictional elements. Science fiction elements include:
  • A time setting in the future, in alternative timelines, or in a historical past that contradicts known facts of history or the archaeological record.
  • A spatial setting or scenes in outer space (e.g. spaceflight), on other worlds, or on subterranean earth.
  • Characters that include aliens, mutants, androids, or humanoidrobots.
  • Futuristic technology such as ray guns, teleportation machines, and humanoid computers.
  • Scientific principles that are new or that contradict accepted laws of nature, for example time travel wormholes, or faster-than-light travel.
  • New and different political or social systems, e.g. dystopian, post-scarcity, or post-apocalyptic.
  • Paranormal abilities such as mind control, telepathy, telekinesis, and teleportation.Other universes or dimensions and travel between them.

As a means of understanding the world through speculation and storytelling, science fiction has antecedents back to mythology, though precursors to science fiction as literature can be seen in Lucian's True History in the 2nd century some of the Arabian Nights tales, The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter in the 10th century and Ibn al-Nafis' Theologus Autodidactus in the 13th century.

A product of the budding Age of Reason and the development of modern science itself, Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels was one of the first true science fantasy works, together with Voltaire's Micromégas (1752) and Johannes Kepler's Somnium (1620–1630). Isaac Asimov and Carl Sagan consider the latter work the first science fiction story. It depicts a journey to the Moon and how the Earth's motion is seen from there. Another example is Ludvig Holberg's novel Nicolai Klimii iter subterraneum, 1741. (Translated to Danish by Hans Hagerup in 1742 as Niels Klims underjordiske Rejse.) (Eng. Niels Klim's Underground Travels.) Brian Aldiss has argued that Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) was the first work of science fiction.

Following the 18th-century development of the novel as a literary form, in the early 19th century, Mary Shelley's books Frankenstein and The Last Man helped define the form of the science fiction novel; later Edgar Allan Poe wrote a story about a flight to the moon. More examples appeared throughout the 19th century.

H. G. Wells

Then with the dawn of new technologies such as electricity, the telegraph, and new forms of powered transportation, writers including Jules Verne and H. G. Wells created a body of work that became popular across broad cross-sections of society. Wells' The War of the Worlds (1898) describes an invasion of late Victorian England by Martians using tripod fighting machines equipped with advanced weaponry. It is a seminal depiction of an alien invasion of Earth.

In the late 19th century, the term "scientific romance" was used in Britain to describe much of this fiction. This produced additional offshoots, such as the 1884 novella Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions by Edwin Abbott Abbott. The term would continue to be used into the early 20th century for writers such as Olaf Stapledon.

Jules Verne

In the early 20th century, pulp magazines helped develop a new generation of mainly American SF writers, influenced by Hugo Gernsback, the founder of Amazing Stories magazine. In 1912 Edgar Rice Burroughs published A Princess of Mars, the first of his three-decade-long series of Barsoom novels, situated on Mars and featuring John Carter as the hero. The 1928 publication of Philip Nolan's original Buck Rogers story, Armageddon 2419, in Amazing Stories was a landmark event. This story led to comic strips featuring Buck Rogers (1929), Brick Bradford (1933), and Flash Gordon (1934). The comic strips and derivative movie serials greatly popularized science fiction. In the late 1930s, John W. Campbell became editor of Astounding Science Fiction, and a critical mass of new writers emerged in New York City in a group called the Futurians, including Isaac Asimov, Damon Knight, Donald A. Wollheim, Frederik Pohl, James Blish, Judith Merril, and others. Other important writers during this period and later, include E.E. (Doc) Smith, Robert A. Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke, Olaf Stapledon, A. E. van Vogt, Ray Bradbury and Stanisław Lem. Campbell's tenure at Astounding is considered to be the beginning of the Golden Age of science fiction, characterized by hard SF stories celebrating scientific achievement and progress. This lasted until postwar technological advances, new magazines such as Galaxy under Pohl as editor, and a new generation of writers began writing stories outside the Campbell mode.

In the 1950s, the Beat generation included speculative writers such as William S. Burroughs. In the 1960s and early 1970s, writers like Frank Herbert, Samuel R. Delany, Roger Zelazny, and Harlan Ellison explored new trends, ideas, and writing styles, while a group of writers, mainly in Britain, became known as the New Wave for their embrace of a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content, and a highbrow and self-consciously "literary" or artistic sensibility. In the 1970s, writers like Larry Niven and Poul Anderson began to redefine hard SF. Ursula K. Le Guin and others pioneered soft science fiction.

In the 1980s, cyberpunk authors like William Gibson turned away from the optimism and support for progress of traditional science fiction. This dystopian vision of the near future is described in the work of Philip K. Dick, such as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and We Can Remember It for You Wholesale, which resulted in the films Blade Runner and Total Recall. The Star Wars franchise helped spark a new interest in space opera, focusing more on story and character than on scientific accuracy. C. J. Cherryh's detailed explorations of alien life and complex scientific challenges influenced a generation of writers. Emerging themes in the 1990s included environmental issues, the implications of the global Internet and the expanding information universe, questions about biotechnology and nanotechnology, as well as a post-Cold War interest in post-scarcity societies; Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age comprehensively explores these themes. Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan novels brought the character-driven story back into prominence. The television series Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) began a torrent of new SF shows, including three further Star Trek spin-off shows and Babylon 5. Concern about the rapid pace of technological change crystallized around the concept of the technological singularity, popularized by Vernor Vinge's novel Marooned in Realtime and then taken up by other authors. Res : wikipedia.
 
Support : Creating Website | eCho |
Copyright © 2011. Sci-Fi World, Science and Fiction Scientist, Researchers, Mysterious World - All Rights Reserved
Template Modify by eCho
Proudly powered by Blog